LATEST NEWS


December 17th, 2014

Potential for “Slow-Burning Genocide” in Burma

By Sho Shibata, Blog Writer

While much of the world applauds Myanmar for its recent policy shifts towards a democratic system, the Rohingya Muslim population continues to face systematic extermination. The Rohingya are increasingly in danger of a “slow-burning genocide,” and so it is imperative that world leaders speak out against those responsible. Other nations have hardly taken Myanmar’s government to task for its segregationist policies and a situation increasingly reminiscent of apartheid. Such policies are not recent developments either – they are, in fact, very old news.

Ethno-religious conflict in Burma pre-dates its independence. The Rohingya are largely concentrated in the Rakhine province, also known as Arakan, which borders Bangladesh to the east. Even prior to Burma’s independence in 1948, the Muslim population was vocal about wanting to annex East Pakistan (present-day Bangladesh). However, the government refused requests for secession, giving rise to a jihad by the Mujahideen Party. Intrastate violence intensified until the rebels were pushed into hiding by retaliatory military operations, which eliminated rebels and any affiliates. Most notably, General Ni Wen’s “King Dragon Operation” in 1978 spurred a refugee crisis with nearly three hundred thousand people fleeing into bordering Bangladesh.

These ongoing events have contributed to the ethno-religious tensions and set the precedent for the present-day persecution. Continuing tensions legitimize policies that subordinate the Rohingya culture for the purpose of grander assimilation into the Burmese Buddhist ethos. The 1982 Citizenship Law delineated three classifications of citizenship: citizen, descendants of citizens who lived in Burma prior to 1823 or were born to parents who are citizens; associate citizen, those who acquired citizenship through the 1948 Union Citizenship Act; naturalized citizen, those who lived in Burma before January 4th 1948 and applied for citizenship after 1982. Under this law, over 800 000 Rohingya people effectively became stateless. More recently, the “Regional Order 1/2005″ – Two Child Policy – regulates the amount of offspring that Rohingya couples may give birth to. If the primary source of income for a typical Rohingya family is agricultural labour, depriving a source of labour impedes socio-economic mobility into a better lifestyle. Moreover, any subsequent children are not entitled to receive any benefits. Institutionalized persecution proliferates against the Rohingya people in these and many other ways.

This brief only touches the surface of issues plaguing Rohingya society. This passive form of violence not only segregates a whole people, but permits a culture of oppression against them from ordinary citizenry. The continuing segregation of the Rohingya people can no longer be marginalized in international attention; the time for action has come.

FURTHER INFORMATION:

HUFFINGTON POST – http://www.huffingtonpost.com/kyaw-min/myanmar-muslims-rohingya_b_4274852.html

TIME – http://time.com/9518/burma-rohingya-crime-against-humanity/

AMNESTY INTERNATIONAL – http://www.amnesty.org.au/refugees/comments/35290/

AL JAZEERA – http://www.aljazeera.com/indepth/spotlight/rohingya/

BIBLIOGRAPHY:

Kipgen, Nehginpao. “Addressing the Rohingya Problem.” Journal of Asian and African Studies (2013): 0021909613505269.

Parnini, Syeda Naushin. “The Crisis of the Rohingya as a Muslim Minority in Myanmar and Bilateral Relations with Bangladesh.” Journal of Muslim Minority Affairs 33.2 (2013): 281-297.

Ragland, Thomas K. “Burma’s Rohingyas in Crisis: Protection on Humanitarian Refugees under International Law.” BC Third World LJ 14 (1994): 301.

Zarni, Maung, and Alice Cowley. “THE SLOW-BURNING GENOCIDE OF MYANMAR’S ROHINGYA.” Pac. Rim L. & Pol’y J. 23 (2014): 683-869.

 

 

Posted in Uncategorized by communications
No Comments »

December 9th, 2014

Tabit Mass Rape Allegations Provoke Backlash Against Darfur Peacekeepers

By Evan Gray, Blog Writer

Last month, local media outlets in Sudan’s Darfur region reported horrifying allegations of a mass rape committed by Sudanese soldiers in the town of Tabit. According to these reports, more than 200 women and children were subjected to sexual violence on the orders of a Sudanese army commander, who mistakenly believed the villagers to be responsible for the disappearance of one of his men. The recent events in Tabit have refocused international attention on the ongoing violence and insecurity in the Darfur region – a serious problem that had fallen out of the public eye in recent years. However, widespread criticism of the response by UNAMID’s, the joint UN-African Union peacekeeping mission in Darfur, has also created a parallel controversy, calling into question the effectiveness of the world’s largest peace-keeping operation.

Read the rest of this entry »

Posted in Uncategorized by communications
No Comments »

December 2nd, 2014

Building a Syrian State

By Chad Rickaby, Blog Writer

Subaltern Realism, as proposed by Mohammad Ayoob, is an interesting re-conceptualization of international relations which pushes the margins of society to centre stage. When applied to the situation in Syria, the theory encourages us to consider the experience of the subaltern (un-empowered people on the margins of post-colonial societies) in the context of state-building. As we will see, Subaltern Realism provides an explanation for Syria’s recent trend of political divisiveness, which progressed quickly into anarchy. Syria’s longstanding inability to develop a unified national identity (which included its subaltern groups) created opportunities for groups like ISIS to garner support and control of the volatile area.

Read the rest of this entry »

Posted in Uncategorized by communications
No Comments »

November 28th, 2014

The Plight of Myanmar’s Rohingya

By Jeremy Luedi, Policy Researcher

In recent years, Myanmar has begun to open up and embark on a laudable path towards democracy. Despite this trajectory, however, another disturbing narrative exists which is increasingly coming to the world’s attention. The plight of the Muslim minority Rohingya people is one of systematic repression teetering on genocide. In 1982 a law was passed denying citizenship to the Rohingya people, who now live in camps or cordoned off villages. Widespread hostility towards the Rohingya and government repression of the group threatens to escalate to systematic violence if relations deteriorate.

Read the rest of this entry »

Posted in Uncategorized by communications
No Comments »

November 18th, 2014

Bringing Peacekeeping into the 21st Century

By Evan Gray, Blog Writer

Since its founding in 1945, the United Nations has taken the maintenance of international peace and security as one of its most important goals. With the organization’s founding member states determined to prevent a repeat of the horrors of WWII, peacekeeping was from the outset seen as a crucial part of the UN’s mandate. This need for an effective international force to keep the peace where governments fail to do so has not diminished, as is evident from the persistence of armed conflict in many parts of the world. However, a look at the history of international peacekeeping shows that the UN’s attempts at intervention often fall far short of the promises contained within its own charter.

Read the rest of this entry »

Posted in Uncategorized by communications
No Comments »

generic and brand viagra online

What is ED? Erectile dysfunction is a disease in which the male penis loses its ability to come to an erection during sexual intercourse. Erectile dysfunction raspostranety mostly in men over thirty years. buy viagra. Drugs that help to cope with erectile dysfunction and restore the joy of sex work as follows: they increase blood flow to the genitals, causing an erection. Ejaculation occurring before the medication too soon or not occurring at all, with drugs ED group also becomes normal.